Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30

Thread: Favorites of Twenty-First Century - 13th Year (actual)

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    8,051

    Default



    i had not heard this lot ta ..
    "Audite et alteram partem"

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Dulwich/Crystal Palace
    Posts
    11,184

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aka Calum Da Jazbo View Post


    i had not heard this lot ta ..
    The Pope - closed mind
    The Odeon - closed down.

    Ida changed my name

    Phew - great track, ta!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Southside (Glasgow, not Chicago)
    Posts
    300

    Default

    Jeremy Pelt, Soul. Pelt (trumpet), J D Allen (tenor), Danny Grissett (piano), Dwayne Burno (bass) and Gerald Cleaver (drums).


    There’s nothing here faster than medium-paced, and it’s predominantly lyrical in mood, but there’s enough variety in the arrangements and the distribution of solos to ensure that this never becomes samey. Pelt’s very generous in sharing out the solos: I reckon that if anything pianist Danny Grissett gets more space than either of the horn players. There’s nothing in the musical language that wouldn’t be familiar to the mid-60s Miles Davis quintet, but it’s in no way backwards looking: as the AllMusic review (http://www.allmusic.com/album/soul-r2367031/review) puts it, Pelt is “taking the tradition and giving it a thoroughly modern twist without sacrificing its heart”. A superb record which just gets better with repeated hearings.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,025

    Default

    Byas

    I was staggered by the last Pelt CD as it sounded like a carbon-copy of the Miles quintet. Even the tunes sounded like something from 1960's Davis records and one of the numbers (from recollection) was almost a paraphrase. As someone who enjoyed Pelt's plugged in group and have been impressed with his playing live, I was hugely disappointed. Granted, the music was very good but the music was even more of a mirror image than anything either Wynton or a host of other 1980's young-Neos put out at the time. Reminded me a bit of Osian Roberts and Steve Fishwick. The music is perfectly acceptable and very assured but in the case of the British musicians is about 60 years out of date. Even Blue Note gave up with this kind of approach by the early 60's! Although I can appreciate the desire to play old arrangements / repertoire as the written music does have interest and musical value, it seems odd to reproduce so faithfully this Hard Bop style even if it is nailed so perfectly.

    The odd thing about Miles' band of this era was that it was really "outside" and perhaps far more adventurous in the manner that it dealt with improvisation than the so called "Avant garde" of the same era. I've been listening to Miles almost without exception for the past month or so and every component of this band is knocking on the extremes of the music. They ride the knife-edge of creativity. The freedom of Ron Carter's bass lines are staggeringly creative and, in my opinion, are almost worth listening to on their own in the way that he "feels" the rhythm or provides a pulse. Plenty has been written about Blanton but Ron Carter probably deserves far more credit . Curious to contrast his playing with Buster Williams on the alternative takes on "Sorcerer" as the difference is palpable. I don't think Miles ever played better himself and players like Shorter, Hancock and Williams are deceptive insofar that a casual listen would suggest orthodoxy whereas they music their vaste musical intelligence to push a harmonic and rythmic approach to it's very boundaries. Hancock is, in my estimation, a far more way out improvisor than Cecil Taylor and his profound understanding of harmony allows him to have a far wider harmonic palette available than Taylor. If you listen to Pelt's band, they have the veneer of Miles' 1960's quintet but the "music" isn't happening on anything like the same scale . Hardly any point trying really! Miles quintet , like Basie's 1930's / 40's band just sounds more modern with the passing of age. In small group jazz, this band marks a defining point in the history of the music the jazz prior to their arrival being distinct from what followed, just as Basie's band defines the end of "vintage jazz." For my money, this band is only matched by Armstrong's Hot 5/7's for the impact in the music and far more of a sea change than anything created by Charlie Parker. They are alchemists and not mere musicians.
    Last edited by Ian Thumwood; 08-05-12 at 22:21.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Southside (Glasgow, not Chicago)
    Posts
    300

    Default

    Billy Hart Quartet (with Ethan Iverson, Ben Street and Mark Turner) "All Our Reasons" (ECM).

    A really interesting blend of different contemporary approaches to playing jazz with a bit of Nordic austerity, a bit of New York contemporary post-bop, and a bit of freeish playing all mixed together into an organic whole. There are lots of passages where you don't have the whole trio playing: for instance, one piece starts and finishes with unaccompanied piano and has a sax, bass and drums trio in the middle. The players are all excellent in their own right, but it's the group sound which impresses rather than the album just being a string of solos. None of the component parts of their music is anything new, but the overall effect is highly individual. The more I listen to this the more I like it.

    The promo video:

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,025

    Default

    Byas

    Don't know if it had ever dawned on you that Mark Turner looks like David James , the former England and P*******th goalkeeper?

    Been checking his playing out on David Binney's "Barefooted town" - a bit of a slow burner.

    Ian

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Southside (Glasgow, not Chicago)
    Posts
    300

    Default

    I hadn't spotted the similarity until you pointed out, but now that you mention it, yes, he does.

    I first came across Turner as part of the Fly Trio with Jeff Ballard and Larry Grenadier. I suppose in the 50s he'd have been classified as a "cool" player. He's got a very clean tenor sound, absolutely consistent in tone from top to bottom of the instrument. His playing's very much about the musical argument of the line, rather than about the expressive potential of the sound of the instrument. One of the more interesting contemporary saxophonists, I think.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,025

    Default

    Byas

    I was thinking exactly the same thing when listening to the David Binney CD as the alto player would similarly be classed as a "cool" player. Sometimes the record does put you in mind of Lee Konitz and Warne Marsh in the almost colourless tone of their playing. You have to listen carefully to distinguish which is the alto and which is the tenor as Turner's tone is so light. Like Marsh and Kontiz, the solos have a kind of intelligent structure about them and even Akinmusire's trumpet buys into the "cool" approach - even if his whole style is probably the least "trumpet-like" since the under-appreciated Kenny Dorham. This is not a disc that you grab your attention immediately but I feel I am enjoying it the more that I listen. It "Cool post-bop" if you want to cool it anything although the tracks often build up to some restrained excitement at the conclusion.

    "Barefoot Town" is one of those discs which gets better with each listening and the second half of the disc is This is the stand out track in my opinion although Virell's introduction to "A night every day" is worth the price of the disc alone. In fact, I feel the "star" of the album is Cuban pianist David Virelles who was over here playing with steve Coleman's trio last year. Binney's approach is completely different from Coleman's which is far more groove-driven. The bass and drums are nowhere near as agressive on "Barefooted town" and the momentum comes from the writing. I didn't used to care for David Binney's work however I am being won over my come convincing appearances of records I have heard recently. Turner's approach offers the same challenges in that it might be considered "cerebral" and detached from the more usual influences like Brecker. He's like a cooler version of Joshua Redman, if anything. Binney's ability as a writer is another reason to check out this disc.

    Anyone heard "Graylen Epicentre?"

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    9

    Default

    I've heard both disks you're talking about and unluckily don't have any of them... But they are amazing! I would listen again and again If I had such an opportunity.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Dulwich/Crystal Palace
    Posts
    11,184

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MaryGreen View Post
    I've heard both disks you're talking about and unluckily don't have any of them... But they are amazing! I would listen again and again If I had such an opportunity.
    Welcome to the fold, Mary!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •