Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Parry Symphonies

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    56

    Default Parry Symphonies

    Quote Originally Posted by Parry1912 View Post
    An excellent Parry bargain on Chandos:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B...pf_rd_i=468294
    At the risk of being accused of listening to quasi-cowpat music, I bought this record, and found it very enjoyable, so I have decided to start exploring Parry's symphonies.

    Does anyone have any recommendations, bearing in mind that I like recordings, as well as performances, to be of good quality.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,236

    Default

    I have two discs of Parry's music, both on LP:

    Boult and the LPO play symphony 5, symphonic vars. and elegy for Brahms (EMI/HMV).
    Boult and the LSO play overture to an unwritten tragedy, an English suite, Lady Radnor's suite and symphonic vars.

    I dont know if either have made it to CD, but if they have I dont think you should hesitate. Boult must be just the man to bring Parry's music to life. He even looks a bit like him ...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    North Wales
    Posts
    7,383

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by umslopogaas View Post
    I have two discs of Parry's music, both on LP:

    Boult and the LPO play symphony 5, symphonic vars. and elegy for Brahms (EMI/HMV).
    Boult and the LSO play overture to an unwritten tragedy, an English suite, Lady Radnor's suite and symphonic vars.

    I dont know if either have made it to CD, but if they have I dont think you should hesitate. Boult must be just the man to bring Parry's music to life. He even looks a bit like him ...
    Symphony 5 certainly has made it to CD, IIRC even more than once. It was actually my very first Parry LP, in the late 1970s.
    I consider this recording as indispensible, though the Bamert recording on Chandos (early 1990s) shows an equally fine interpretation IMO.
    The other LP made it at least once to CD, on Lyrita IIRC.
    I think that the overture received its first recording on this LP.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    10,716

    Default

    These might be useful to you, Russ:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_...es%2Caps%2C271

    ... the Boult discs quite correctly highly-praised by umslppy are amongst the goodies! Bambert's Symphony cycle is also treasurable.

    Happy Listening!

    (Not "cowpat" of any description, [quasi-, proto- or pre- by the way. That epithet was reserved for the post-RVW pre-Walton "school" of English composers.)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Between a rock and a hard place
    Posts
    6,817

    Default

    You can't go wrong with this set.



    It certainly isn't cowpat music!
    There is some wonderful chamber music by him on cd too.
    FHG beat me to it.
    "Music is the best means we have of digesting time".

    W. H. Auden

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    North Wales
    Posts
    7,383

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Russ_H View Post
    At the risk of being accused of listening to quasi-cowpat music, I bought this record, and found it very enjoyable, so I have decided to start exploring Parry's symphonies.

    Does anyone have any recommendations, bearing in mind that I like recordings, as well as performances, to be of good quality.
    Apart from the very fine Symphony no.5 and the brahmsian (what else? ) Elegy for Brahms it was especially the slow mvt of Symphony 2 which convinced me of the quality of Parry's symphonic output.

    I wholeheartedly second EdgelyRob's recommendation.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    4,472

    Default

    The Boult discs are in afive disc set that also includes del Mar's Stanford Irish Symphony - and very good they are too.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chandler's Ford and Capiz
    Posts
    3,504

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ferneyhoughgeliebte View Post
    ...(Not "cowpat" of any description, [quasi-, proto- or pre- by the way. That epithet was reserved for the post-RVW pre-Walton "school" of English composers.)
    I agree wholeheartedly. Parry was a 19th-Century composer, trained in, and revering the German tradition. He wrote very enjoyable music, in which Schumann and Mendelssohn are prominent, though Wagner and Brahms join in, too.

    All the discs mentioned here are fine (I've not really heard a poor Parry recording). There's plenty of songs, piano, organ and chamber music on disc, too - and don't forget some very fine choral music. The Songs of Farewell are a must, at least.

    My personal choice would be Symphony 3, Symphony 5, Symphonic Variations, Elegy for Brahms, Lady Radnor's Suite, English Suite and the Piano Concerto.

    The 'cowpat' epithet was never true of RVW, either - only to those who wanted to be dismissive.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chandler's Ford and Capiz
    Posts
    3,504

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roehre View Post
    Symphony 5 certainly has made it to CD, IIRC even more than once. It was actually my very first Parry LP, in the late 1970s.
    I consider this recording as indispensible, though the Bamert recording on Chandos (early 1990s) shows an equally fine interpretation IMO.
    The other LP made it at least once to CD, on Lyrita IIRC.
    I think that the overture received its first recording on this LP.
    The EMI recordings are from Boult's very last recording session, in Abbey Road No.1, over four days and ending on 20 December 1978. (His first session had been on 5 November 1920.) It was known in advance that it was to be his last, and EMI had asked him to name the programme. Boult wanted to do an all-Parry programme of pieces that had not been recorded before, and chose Symphony 5, Elegy for Brahms, and From Death to Life. Problem was, no-one could find the performing materials for the latter (this is where I come in, because I was one of those who tried); the piece had been performed, but not since WW1, and the parts had vanished. They had to be copied out for Mattias Bamert's later recording, but there wasn't time for this to be done for Boult, so he (a little sadly) plumped for a second recording of the Symphonic Variations.

    I understand that EMI recorded the sessions, or part of them, in experimental digital, although they've never released this version. If this is so, then Boult must be almost the only (possibly the only?) person to record acoustically and digitally.

    Boult's attitude to his last session was typical. His very first professional concert, on 27 February 1914, had included two first performances - The Banks of Green Willow, by his friend George Butterworth, and the first British performance of Hugo Wolf's Italian Serenade. A very great and selfless man.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cuckfield West Sussex
    Posts
    7,499

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Russ_H View Post
    At the risk of being accused of listening to quasi-cowpat music, I bought this record, and found it very enjoyable, so I have decided to start exploring Parry's symphonies.

    Does anyone have any recommendations, bearing in mind that I like recordings, as well as performances, to be of good quality.
    I have that recording and bought it when it first came out! Strongly recomended.
    Music is in the air all around you. You just take of it as much as you want(Sir Edward Elgar)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •