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Thread: this weekends jazz offerings from the management

  1. #1
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    Default this weekends jazz offerings from the management

    JL
    is a rerun of Milt Jackson with the man hisself speaking

    JLU
    features pianists John Turville and Takana Miyamoto.
    A multi-award winning pianist, John Turville (UK) and an internationally-acclaimed pianist/composer Takana Miyamoto (Japan/USA) were introduced to each other by a mutual friend, pianist Frank Harrison. John and Takana will explore the sound of two pianos featuring their original compositions, as well as their favourite jazz standards' recorded at the Pizza Express Jazz Club, Dean Street in London.
    Also Claire Martin talks to "Bad Bone", Dennis Rollins about his Velocity Trio and Congo born Baloji - both appearing at this year's Brighton Festival.
    but playlist is short so long tracks?

    Jon3
    presents saxophonist Joe McPhee and Survival Unit III in concert at Cafe Oto in London. McPhee began his career in the late 60s with the first incarnation of his free-jazz Survival Unit Trio. Although recording prolifically and earning recognition in Europe over the ensuing years, McPhee didn't earn wider recognition in the US until the 1990s. Since then he has performed regularly alongside Ken Vandermark, with Peter Brotzmann's Chicago Tentet and with his own Trio X. This latest version of Survival Unit features percussionist Michael Zerang and cellist Fred Lonberg-Holm.
    and a couple of items from Marcus Strickland ...

    ho hum fancy McPhee because this is how i first came across his work

    "Audite et alteram partem"

  2. #2
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    I was at the Turville / Miyamoto set at the Pizza Express when it was recorded, as I was covering the Steinway Festival there for the newspaper. No doubt JLU will play the best bits, but this is what I said in the Times:
    One of the more promising partnerships featured the British film composer, bandleader and pianist Janette Mason, paired with the American singer and bebopper Dena DeRose.
    Their curtain-raiser was another unexpected pairing, with John Turville from London and the Japanese player Takana Miyamoto, making her debut at the club. Unfortunately, having raised the metaphorical curtain, it got stuck, ushering in a long opening set that started well but meandered off into paddy fields of ennui.
    Ignoring the signs of the club management to wind up their performance, the two played on for a further half hour, proving mainly that Turville’s inventive vocabulary is very limited, as he insensitively swamped Miyamoto’s more delicate and thoughtful ideas. At her best, these were excellent. She produced a display of pianistic fireworks in a four-handed adaptation of Smetana’s Vltava, in which improvisation gradually crept into the piece’s classical formality, and her minimalist Japanese song This Way was beautifully and sincerely played.

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    Very interesting to hear Milt Jackson speaking. Most impressed with his photographic memory - but I guess extraordinary talents are required to the top of the business.

    But the vibraphone, despite all the famous artists that have performed with it, and are still performing, must be one of the more difficult instruments to play Jazz on. I mean notes can't be bent, always the same pleasant tone. I find myself often passing over this instrument as a worthwhile "listen"

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    oe McPhee's Survival Unit III

    Young hotshots and late bloomers sit side by side on this week's Jazz on 3. Our recent US free-jazz odyssey continues with a storming set from veteran Joe McPhee and his trio, and we've also got an exclusive solo session by the saxophonist Marcus Strickland.
    A true maverick, McPhee has spent much of his career in relative obscurity, often shunned by fellow musicians frightened by his ‘dangerous’ sound. This is the struggle behind the title of tonight’s project – Survival Unit III, in which McPhee, primarily known as a saxophonist, plays pocket trumpet. He has found two kindred, subversive spirits - self proclaimed ‘anti-cellist’ Fred Lonberg Holm; and Michael Zerang, who, as McPhee points out in his introduction to the music, is not your typical ‘ting ting-ka-ting’ jazz drummer. Add in special guest Evan Parker, and the result is exhilarating, as well as a demonstration of enormous stamina (listen out for Parker’s circular-breathing soprano solo marathon!).
    Last time we were at Café Oto, the venue of tonight's main performance, it was to record Roscoe Mitchell, who appeared that night in the company of the outstanding British drummer and percussionist Tony Marsh. Sadly Tony died earlier this month, and I’ll be playing one of the highlights from that gig in his memory.
    Also on the programme, a saxophonist who is at a much earlier stage of his career: Marcus Strickland faces his fear of silence to bring us a snappy, energetic and witty solo performance.
    Join me for all this on Monday 16 April from 11pm, or listen online for seven days after broadcast.
    from the management
    "Audite et alteram partem"

  5. #5
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    Have to say that on the strength of last evening's broadcast I agree with Alyn's assessment of Mr Turville, whose playing reminded me very much of a certain Welsh jazz pianist who does quite a few Bill Evans tributes in his recitals, and whom I always find to be more flowery than incisive.

    The Milt Jackson programme was great.

  6. #6
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    Turville / Miyamoto

    probably the worst music i've heard in a long while.

    mc phee was great - in terms of reflecting the emotional sentiments of the times; as was the neneh cherry number (that began the show iirc)

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    thanks handsomefortune i started listening to Nenah Cherry and then Marcus Strickland failed to catch my ear and i split and missed McPhee
    "Audite et alteram partem"

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    you'd best go back and have a listen then calum da jazbo, as it was quite something....! it was all in there, and alarmingly familiar - 2012 zeitgeist sneering, joshing, nitpicking etc all gulped down with the help of some enigmatic drums.

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