In Tune

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    In Tune

    Has there ever been a thread specifically about "In Tune"?

    I am interested to learn more about how this programme is perceived. It fits broadly into the category "Not the Traditional Radio 3". At the same time, the overwhelming criticism is of "Breakfast" and "Essential Classics".

    Ideally comments should be made in relation to form and content rather than presentation. That is probably particularly true of negative thoughts.

    The presenters, though, are quite chatty as well as knowledgeable and I have heard all kinds of music on the programme. Classical music, songs from the musicals, a fair bit of jazz, some world music.

    So it would be interesting to hear from people who like it why they feel it is more acceptable than the morning programmes. For example, is it about peoples' expectations according to the time of day?

    With luck, the feedback might cast more light on what is wrong with the morning programmes and from a slightly different angle.
    Last edited by Guest; 29-11-12, 02:24.

    #2
    Originally posted by Lateralthinking1 View Post
    I am interested to learn more about how this programme is perceived. It fits broadly into the category "Not the Traditional Radio 3". At the same time, the overwhelming criticism is of "Breakfast" and "Essential Classics".
    Perhaps because IT hasn't changed much and could have been considered a lost cause for quite a long time, whereas the other two have been more obviously on a visible downward slope over the last few years.

    Comment


      #3
      There was an interesting programme last week in which a Beethoven Symphony (no.2) was played by a cellist and pianist in a reduction. It made for fascinating listening and to these ears seemed very well-played.

      I find Rafferty good value as a presenter. Just the right level of enthusiasm and solid knowledge of the repertory. Bonhomie, amiable repartee without reducing himself to fawning. Others could learn from this.

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        #4
        It has some interesting things, but in between the guests which sometimes enlightening sometimes not, often presents the same fare as Breakfast & EC. I cannot abide old Gafferty I'm afraid. His knowledge isn't actually that good, he makes regular gaffes (hence my nickname for him) and there's far too much er...well....em....yes etc from him. This programme seems to have dropped in importance, as playlists are often missed out, which means I have to flick through the programme on iplayer to see if there's anything of interest and to conduct my survey. It looks like last Friday's hasn't been put up again, so I'll have to trawl through it tomorrow evening.

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          #5
          Although I suppose the blessed Sean does it to put his guests at ease I find his relentless jollying along of them, together with his rather camp vocabulary, very off-putting and I tune in to this programme less and less frequently. When my journey home coincides with it I much prefer Radio Four's PM, especially when Eddie Mair is presenting.

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            #6
            Originally posted by Lateralthinking1 View Post
            Ideally comments should be made in relation to form and content rather than presentation.
            is it possible to seperate the two given a single presenter (at least 90% ? of time) who I'm afraid is an instant turn off for me and as appeared often on this board in the past, many others. The previous programmes from which this and the single dominant presenter derived offered much more variation in format, music and style. However I have not listened to it now for several years apart from the odd times when I forget it being given an additional 30 mins.

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              #7
              I can't agree with #3. I find it very much L'Apr├Ęs-midi d'un Fawn.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Frances_iom View Post
                is it possible to seperate the two given a single presenter...
                ...and the high interview content. Agree with Frances.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Frances_iom View Post
                  is it possible to seperate the two given a single presenter (at least 90% ? of time) who I'm afraid is an instant turn off for me and as appeared often on this board in the past, many others.
                  I accept that it is difficult. Before beginning this thread I did try to see what had been written elsewhere. Not a lot really but where it had been there was quite a lot about Sean Rafferty. Some are very keen on him and others not at all keen. To my mind, this places him in the same category as Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Rob Cowan. All very plus or minus. Petroc gets some comment, usually that people like him but he is in the wrong programme. Sarah Walker doesn't get much comment in either direction.

                  Most of the heat in discussions is not about who people like and don't like but whether contributors feel that it is right or not to comment on personalities. To avoid that, it is possible to say whether an informal presentation style is enjoyed at certain times and not at others. But the more interesting aspects concern the content - for example, a month or so ago I think Sean had a group from Colombia or Mexico playing live and he features songs by Sondheim. He has recently invited in Gwilym Simcock.

                  So there is that thought about its fairly broad music mix. I also think there is an identifiable concept of sorts. As the programme takes listeners towards the main evening, it seems to link in with live events, either by having live performances or referring to performances taking place outside. There is just a touch of theatre land about it. Some might even say that it is a quarter of the way to Late Junction but that's a slightly different point. Perhaps I am totally wrong in this assessment. Do tell me if I am.

                  Among the questions I find myself asking is whether the live component enables a broader music mix to be more acceptable; whether the programme seems somehow more coherent/cohesive than the morning programmes; whether it lacks some of the pitfalls - ie gimmicks; and whether it doesn't jar as much because people aren't waking up to it. That is what I have in mind. While it isn't traditional Radio 3, it feels to me like a BBC programme. I would argue that it has far more character than Classic FM.
                  Last edited by Guest; 28-11-12, 23:59.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Well, I do listen to In Tune regularly (or at least the second half of it since it moved to its 1630 slot) during my drive home, to which I find it the perfect accompaniment. I do like Sean Rafferty and I like the mix of musics (sic) and interviews. I was present at the live broadcast from the Sage Gateshead during the Freethinking Festival and found him very affable.

                    I think the programme is entirely appropriate for the time of day ("drivetime"). I used to listen (years ago) to PM (and Today) on Radio 4 during my commute, but would not go back to them. I'm glad we don't have to suffer news updates every 15 minutes during In Tune though (c.f. Breakfast).

                    OG

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                      #11
                      For me, it depends on the guests and music played. So I'll sit on the fence, though leaning slightly towards Frances. Which won't please her!

                      For me, Sean's very variable: sometimes, he makes me cringe, and sometimes he seems to come over well, ask the right questions and make the guests at ease. (It would be interesting to hear from someone who has been interviewed).

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                        #12
                        The only time I listen to it (well, almost the only time) is when driving (wasn't it called 'Drive Time' once?), and it seems to fill the bill quite nicely, I have to admit, although, as someone said, perhaps our expectations aren't too high in the first place. But there's rather too much forced bonhomie in the chats with musicians for this old(ish)- stager, brought up on the stiff upper lip. But that goes for quite a lot of R3 these days, alas.

                        Who's for a programme called 'Inaccessible Classics', by the way?

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                          #13
                          I enjoy In Tune very much. There is no way in which it can be compared with the ghastly morning programmes. I find Rafferty very engaging as a presenter, but the main point of the programme so far as I am concerned is the in-studio interviews and live performances by artists who are in some way "topical", as they are to appear shortly in a concert somewhere. I particularly value these interviews when they relate to a musical event which I am about to attend myself!

                          I regard In Tune as a most acceptable feature of R3 programming, and I would greatly miss it if it disappeared.

                          I have attended two live In Tune sessions this year; before the Imogen Cooper concert in Kings Place at the start of the "Schubert Fest", and at the Edinburgh Festival. Both were extremely enjoyable.

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                            #14
                            The music is sometimes decent.
                            rafferty has turned fawning into an art form, and his research appears to be non existent, frequently asking irrelevant questions, or saying things to interviewees that are plain wrong. interviews are in most cases pointless anyway and seldom add to the music.
                            I gave up on it, in the main, a long time ago. An utterly wasted opportunity for what could be a highpoint of the day.
                            I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered. My life is my own.

                            I am not a number, I am a free man.

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                              #15
                              I don't listen regularly but don't dislike Sean. I think his bumbling sometimes gets guests talking as they correct him.
                              I caught the end of an interview with Kirill Karabits a few days ago, but can't find it now. Can anyone help please?

                              And as someone with some recent hearing problems I wish the laughter could be restrained a little. I'm very pleased that all concerned are enjoying themselves but it makes difficult listening

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