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    My second novel, a continuation of the first book, currently editing it. It will be published during the summer
    Best regards,
    Jonathan

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      The Collaborators, by Ian Buruma, whose The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany in Japan was a great read. The new one is fascinating

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        I picked up Anna Beer's book "Sounds and Sweet airs" which is an account of the lives of various female composers. I think most people in here love the idea of discovering the works of a forgotten musician /composer and getting into something that no one else seems to be aware of. This books seems to be the product of such a whim by the writer but, having read the first two chapters on Francesca Cuccini and Barbara Strozzi I am staggered by the fact that I was left with no idea whatsoever what their music sounded like. So far, I am finding the book to be a complete muddle and more fascinated by it's own feminist agenda.The actual music seems like an after-thought and the jumbled nature of the text makes these two chapters a nightmare as pieces of biographical writing.

        I want to finish this book as it is something that interests me even though two composers I wanted to learn about (Emily Mayer and Louise Ferrenc) are only mentioned in passing. Chaminade is missed completely It is a wierd selection of composers with only two coming from the 20th century (no reference to Baciesizc! ) and only one example really being a truly "great" composer - Lili Boulanger. Judith Wier is mentioned in passing and there is nothing at all about Sally Beamish. I am perplexed and would have though that the limited circumstances for many female composers in 18th and 19th century would have rendered the subjects near identtical in their experiences. The reviews of Amazon not the absence of Hildegard of Bingen and I can't help feeling that a wider range of subjects would have made this a more interesting book.

        So far I am finding this book to be a huge disappointment. Has anyone else read it? Female composers deserve something much better.

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          I'm afraid it's the sort of book I wouldn't touch with a barge pole, as I can smell a mile off that it's a feminist rant first and a book about music very much second, just to get people to read it. I hear radio programmes in the same vein every now and then, all repeating the same worn-out fallacies: 'women have always been silenced ': well, clearly the author has never been to Salford!. 'We're not used to women speaking out and having strong opinions'. Well. I am, I've had bucketloads of that since 1952!

          Incidentally, Strozzi and co. are often played on Through the Night as well as 'Afternoon Concert', and while we don;t hear as much Weir and Bingham as we used to, they're still very much around.

          I'm re-reading La Dame aux Camelias before it gets banned as a 'misogynist' book.





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            John Updike.

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              Shorelines by Robert Jellicoe, an oral history gathered from the fishermen of Southwold.
              Last edited by gradus; 04-02-24, 10:55.

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                Originally posted by DracoM View Post
                John Updike.
                Which book? He was quite prolific

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                  This time, a collection of short stories ; ' Your lover just called'.

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                    Originally posted by DracoM View Post
                    This time, a collection of short stories ; ' Your lover just called'.
                    I'm having another wander through the Broadway of Damon Runyan in 'Guys and Dolls'. I saw it in a charity shop at the weekend and couldn't resist another stroll through that wonderful language in the company of those larger than life characters.

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                      The left handed booksellers of London, Garth Nix
                      Best regards,
                      Jonathan

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                        Anna Beer's book is unsufferable. It is wierd to read about a composer and only fnind the odd snippet of information to reveal what instruemtns these women composered for. Halfway through and Iit only served to make me annoyed. Female composers deserve better than this twaddle.

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                          "Abolish the Monarchy" by Graham Smith. One of today's 99p Kindle downloads.
                          My life, each morning when I dress, is four and twenty hours less. (J Richardson)

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                            The Last Chronicle of Barset.
                            Trollope.
                            I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered. My life is my own.

                            I am not a number, I am a free man.

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                              'Pratt' said Crosbie, putting his hand in his friend's shoulder , 'do you see that girl there in the dark blue habit?'
                              'What, the one nearest to the path?'
                              'Yes. That is Lily Dale'
                              'Lily Dale!'
                              Yes. That is Lily Dale.'

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                                Originally posted by teamsaint View Post
                                The Last Chronicle of Barset.
                                Trollope.


                                You might enjoy this 'updated' series:

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